Intelligent Utility Mar / Apr 2014
In This Issue
  • ERM Power is the fourth largest seller of electricity in Australia’s National Electricity Market (NEM). We are a diversified energy company, and we aspire to be the preferred supplier of energy to business customers across Australia. Our strategy is simple: provide value-add products and industry-leading customer service. Early in 2013 we began implementing a demand response initiative designed...
  • By Tom Kerber  Google announced its $3.2 billion acquisition of Nest, a manufacturer of smart thermostats and other connected products, in January 2014. This transaction positions Google as a key player in the rapidly changing demand response (DR) market. Demand response programs are transitioning away from the traditional thermostat DR business model where the utility markets, procures,...
  • The term “smart city,” like the term “smart grid,” is amorphous. It grows. It changes. It engulfs other ideas through a type of groupthink osmosis. But, within our brains, that fuzzy little smart city concept revolves around more intelligent technology working together across traditionally disparate industries that “touch” under a municipal umbrella: power, water, transport, lighting.   The...
  • During the last three to five years, we have seen asset management—long entrenched in the domain of the tactically-oriented O & M department—become a key part of a utility’s strategy. From justifying rates cases to long-term planning and budgeting, asset managers are now in the “strategy business.”  Figure 1 (see lead art for this story) shows the data sources being used for asset...
  • Oracle’s Guerry Waters can be extremely candid for a corporate executive. When he tells you how much he enjoys your writing, that’s a good thing (at least for me). When he lists issues that a utility needs to tackle this year, it may not seem like such a good thing to all involved. After all, it’s a complicated list. He counts big data, distributed generation, getting regulators in sync,...