Commentary

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    Aug 09, 2013 | Ronald Willoughby
    More aggressive use of CVR (Conservation Voltage Regulation or Reduction) offers the power industry an essentially untapped strategic resource for meeting energy efficiency goals while saving dollars for the end-user and utility. CVR can also improve system operating efficiencies, produce significant energy savings, and reduce overall demand.
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    Aug 05, 2013 | Rafael Herzberg
    The demand response (DR) classical definition is changes in electric usage by end-use customers from their normal consumption patterns in response to changes in the price of electricity over time, or to incentive payments designed to induce lower electricity use at times of high wholesale market prices or when system reliability is jeopardized.
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    Aug 02, 2013 | Les Lambert, P.E.
    Over decades, a widely accepted mythology has blossomed in the large building energy efficiency community. This mythology says that if we just build new buildings to be efficient, and replace or retrofit existing buildings, we can drastically reduce building energy use.
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    Jul 30, 2013 | Michael John
    The need for security in smart metering is well understood. But ensuring security end-to-end means addressing potential issues at each stage of the meter's lifecycle, writes Elster's Michael John, solutions manager.
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    Jul 15, 2013 | Jason Jungreis
    This is an article speculating upon advanced cars of the future, looking at the near-future (5 years), mid-future (10 years), and longer-future (15-20 years) future. I say "advanced" cars because of course not all features appear everywhere instantly: typically, there are some vehicles that are early adopters of new technology, and conventional vehicles may continue to be made well after the advent of new technology (consider a comparison of the technologies in my four-wheel vehicles: a Toyota RAV4 EV and a Dodge Caravan).
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    Jul 11, 2013 | Ashish Gupta
    Utilities are producing big volume of data that is coming from smart meters, smart sensors and other new devices. With the significant increase in amount of incoming data utilities may face challenges if this data is not managed effectively. The exponential growth in meter data will impact system performance as extracting information will be sluggish and utilities will not be able to analyze information quickly which is required for effective decision making. Moreover Managing and extracting business value out of the huge data without use of big data analytics tool can devastate current IT resources.
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    Jul 10, 2013 | Lucas McIntosh
    As utilities face increasingly challenging market conditions, electric vehicles (EVs) may present utilities with some interesting opportunities. Challenges ahead for utilities are expected to strain their financial health, which will likely result in retail rate increases. And that's where EVs might offer revenue growth that could help offset revenue loss from current energy efficiency trends and rising costs from expansive infrastructure replacement and upgrade investments.
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    Jul 08, 2013 | Malcolm Metcalfe
    Grid-scale energy storage technologies are set to play a crucial role in the today's evolving power system. System operators and utilities are continuously working to improve grid efficiency and reliability and look to storage technologies to do so. Storage can lend a helping hand in implementing numerous applications, including renewable integration, power flow optimization, frequency regulation, and congestion management. However, it is important to utilize technologies that can accomplish this in the most economic and efficient way. Let's take a look at the different storage methods that are in use today.
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    Jun 18, 2013 | Kristopher Settle
    One of the biggest concerns with many forms of renewable energy is their inability to store active energy during times when the sun isn't out, or when the wind isn't blowing. With these energies gaining popularity and growing at an impressive rate, it seems as though establishing an efficient form of energy storage is a foregone conclusion for the future.
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    Jun 17, 2013 | Sarah Battaglia
    So you have decided to enroll your facility in a demand response program. You understand that your organization will be protecting the electric grid from blackouts and brownouts during times of high demand, and you are aware of the revenue your organization will earn from this program. The only thing left to do is to work with your demand response provider and develop a successful reduction strategy to implement during an emergency event. Although each organization is different and will require a tailored plan, there are eight main strategies that prove to be effective for most facilities.