Commentary

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    Dec 30, 2013 | Joao Gomes
    A study conducted by - American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ACEEE) - the survey evaluated the use of energy from 25 indicators, divided into four key areas: Industry, Transportation, Building and National Efforts to promote Energy Efficiency. According to the study, a country that uses less energy to achieve the same result, or even overcome, reduces costs and pollute less, creating a more competitive economy.
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    Dec 26, 2013 | Scott Braynard
    The continued string of recent corporate security breaches has caused many enterprise organizations to evaluate their security practices in an effort to better protect their data and that of their customers. But what about the threat cyber attacks pose to utilities?
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    Dec 24, 2013 | Paul Batistelli
    The United States is facing some serious issues with its electricity grid. The infrastructure was established more than a century ago, before the Internet or cellphones or a lot of renewable energy generation. It simply wasn't equipped to handle today's electricity load.
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    Dec 23, 2013 | Davis Swan
    I recently joined a discussion about how gravity might be used to generate and store energy. One of the comments provided a link to Gravity Power, a company that has proposed a modified take on "pumped storage" whereby a vertical water reservoir is used with a heavy piston. During the discussions a few variations on this technology were proposed. I suggested that abandoned open pit mines might represent a good starting point for very large facilities.
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    Dec 17, 2013 | V. Rory Jones
    Consumer expectations for utility service providers are rising quickly as they see the benefits of a broad range of information-based products from other parts of their lives. As it happens, these rising expectations are accompanied by increasing consumer choices for the source of their utility services - whether from competitor retailers, CCAs (which seem to be rolling out with accelerating momentum), even solar panels, and possibly fuel cells in a few years from now.
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    Dec 10, 2013 | Ashley Hieb
    As more social media networks launch, the key to success will be to determine which social channels are the most important and when to use them appropriately. 76% of utilities think outage communications is the most important topic for their social media content, while 51% think Twitter and Facebook are now extremely important to their customer contact strategy, according to an August 2013 Chartwell Inc. survey of 47 utilities in North America, representing nearly 67 million customers.
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    Dec 03, 2013 | Kevin Monte de Ramos
    No longer are utilities vertical-integrated from source to home. Reliable energy is assured by SMART grid investments; providing many of us the comfort of a heightened standard of living, raising productivity levels by subsidizing energy efficient end-uses, and making obtainable the luxuries of our aspirational society.
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    Nov 27, 2013 | Dr. Michel Gisiger
    The transition from coal to oil and gas in the 19/20th centuries did not occur because the world was expected to run out of coal. It took place because the economics were in favor of oil and also because this new energy raw material proved to be more versatile, easier to handle and beneficial to human comfort (remember London smog).
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    Nov 22, 2013 | Douglas Picadio
    In today's environment, everyone is being tasked with doing more with less. A company's decision to add resources, re-allocate resources or cut resources all become reactions to the same basic mandate, streamlining for efficiencies. Such mandates lead to the big question, what functional areas within a company lend themselves to process streamlining?
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    Nov 18, 2013 | James Greenberger
    Earlier this week I spoke with an old friend, who works in the utility practice group of a major management consulting firm.  We commiserated about the challenges of getting conservative electric utilities to adopt new technology. My friend opined that the only way to get the attention of utility management is to paint a picture of Armageddon. And there is no surer way to do that, he said, than by talking to them about distributed generation.